SPRING SALE!

SPRING SALE!

20% OFF EVERYTHING IN STORE.

For a very limited time use this coupon: SPRING20

To start shopping now, click here:

https://www.etsy.com/shop/FurugiStar?ref=si_shop


Araihari: The Art of Washing Kimono

Neat parcels of fabric with crispy paper labels browned with age.

After opening up a bundle for the first time I discovered it’s hidden secret.

It was a former kimono from a previous life waiting to be rediscovered.

The kanji describes the details of the original garment and the previous owner.

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Matsukawa River Tub Race

Looking for a peaceful retreat from Tokyo I headed to the Izu Peninsular. I found Ks House in Ito. An historical maze of wood, stone and tatami.

Looking out of the balcony of my hotel room over the river I had no idea the very next day I would be sailing down it inside a wooden tub!

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Living Tokyo Vintage

Chuo Cinema, Sangenjaya is the perfect place to chill out after a long day. Tucked away behind the main street it is easily missed, but I am so glad I found it.

There are no premieres here I am afraid. Usually films that have just been released for rental.

Watching the film is only half the fun.

 

 

 

 

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Boro: Japanese folk fabric

After buying a boro scarf at a Tokyo flea market I wanted to learn more about the scruffy, stylish fabric. I pulled at a loose thread and unraveled an interesting tale going back hundreds of years.

Boro was born of forgotten values of ‘mottainai’ or ‘too good to waste’. An idea dangerously lacking in the modern consumer lifestyle.

The charm of boro is not only the indigo shades and shabby street chic, or even its eco-friendliness. Sewn together over generations, family sagas are woven through the threads. click below to read on…

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Kokeshi dolls: More Than a Pretty Face

Click photo to buy this item in FurugiStar on Etsy

Traditional kokeshi ningyo are Japanese dolls with a colourful history and controversial reputation.  They have been associated with miscarried babies and infanticide. They were guardians of children and keepers of their souls. Today, the word kokeshi is a sexual innuendo due to the phallic shape.

Kokeshi were originally souvenirs for Japanese tourists and offered entertainment to children but developed into something much more. The dolls are fascinating, shocking, sad or mundane depending on the perspective. click below to read on..

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